Breast Cancer-My Type

Hey y’all! I wanted to sit down and explain more to you what my breast cancer type is and what it all means. This is all new to me so please take this with a grain of salt and know that I’m educating myself as well as trying to educate you!

IDC — Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), sometimes called infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is the most common type of breast cancer. About 80% of all breast cancers are invasive ductal carcinomas.

Invasive means that the cancer has “invaded” or spread to the surrounding breast tissues. Ductal means that the cancer began in the milk ducts, which are the “pipes” that carry milk from the milk-producing lobules to the nipple. Carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues that cover internal organs — such as breast tissue. All together, “invasive ductal carcinoma” refers to cancer that has broken through the wall of the milk duct and begun to invade the tissues of the breast. Over time, invasive ductal carcinoma can spread to the lymph nodes and possibly to other areas of the body.

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 180,000 women in the United States find out they have invasive breast cancer each year. Most of them are diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma.

Although invasive ductal carcinoma can affect women at any age, it is more common as women grow older. According to the American Cancer Society, about two-thirds of women are 55 or older when they are diagnosed with an invasive breast cancer. Invasive ductal carcinoma also affects men.

invasive_ductal_carcinoma_idc_tcm8-326750

Normal breast with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in an enlarged cross-section of the duct

Breast profile:
A Ducts
B Lobules
C Dilated section of duct to hold milk
D Nipple
E Fat
F Pectoralis major muscle
G Chest wall/rib cage

Enlargement (this is what I have and in the same place too!)
A Normal duct cell
B Ductal cancer cells breaking through the basement membrane.
C Basement membrane

 

Signs and Symptoms of IDC

At first, invasive ductal carcinoma may not cause any symptoms. Often, an abnormal area turns up on a screening mammogram (X-ray of the breast), which leads to further testing.

In some cases, the first sign of invasive ductal carcinoma is a new lump or mass in the breast that you or your doctor can feel. According to the American Cancer Society, any of the following unusual changes in the breast can be a first sign of breast cancer, including invasive ductal carcinoma:

  • swelling of all or part of the breast
  • skin irritation or dimpling
  • breast pain
  • nipple pain or the nipple turning inward
  • redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin
  • a nipple discharge other than breast milk
  • a lump in the underarm area

THIS IS HOW I FOUND MY LUMP, I ROLLED OVER IN BED TO GO TO SLEEP AFTER WATCHING A FEW EPISODES OF VAMPIRE DIARIES AND THOUGHT I ROLLED ONTO A DOG BONE OR TOY THAT THE PUPS HAVE DRAGGED INTO BED…. WELL, OBVIOUSLY IT WAS MY BOOB. I NEW IMMEDIATELY SOMETHING WAS WRONG.

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE check your boobies often and KNOW your body! I’ve known from the beginning that something was wrong and it would end up with getting a double mastectomy. I know my body well and I had the gut feeling it would lead to where I am now.

 

 

 

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